Notice of Deficiency: Everything You Need to Know

The notice of deficiency is a very important document. It is the taxpayer’s first notice of the proposed assessment and provides important information on how to dispute the assessment. It is important to review the notice carefully and to take action if the taxpayer disagrees with the proposed assessment. 

Given how important it is, it’s best that you have a good understanding of notice of deficiency. To help you out, here’s a brief breakdown of everything that you need to know about the notice of deficiency. 
What Is a Notice of Deficiency?
A Notice of Deficiency is a document sent by the IRS to a taxpayer that states the amount of tax owed and the reason for the deficiency. The notice also includes instructions for how the taxpayer can dispute the deficiency.

The notice is typically sent after the IRS has completed an audit of the taxpayer’s return and found that the taxpayer owes more tax than was reported on the return. However, the notice can also be sent in other situations, such as when the IRS determines that the taxpayer failed to report all of their income.

The notice will include the amount of tax that is owed, as well as any penalties and interest that has accrued. It will also list the date by which the taxpayer must respond to the notice in order to dispute the deficiency. If the taxpayer does not dispute the deficiency, they will be required to pay the amount owed. If the taxpayer disputes the deficiency, they will need to provide evidence to support their position.
How Does a Notice of Deficiency Work?
The notice of deficiency is the first step in the IRS’s collection process. The taxpayer has the opportunity to dispute the notice by filing a petition with the Tax Court. If the taxpayer does not dispute the notice, the IRS will begin to collect the additional tax owed.

The notice will also include information on how the taxpayer can dispute the deficiency. Generally, the taxpayer will need to file a formal protest with the IRS within 90 days of the date of the notice. If the taxpayer does not dispute the deficiency, the IRS will assess the tax and send a bill to the taxpayer.

If the taxpayer disputes the deficiency, the IRS will generally hold off on assessing the tax while the dispute is resolved. However, the IRS can assess the tax at any time if it believes that the taxpayer is not acting in good faith.
What Are the Different Types of Notices of Deficiency?
There are several types of notices of deficiency. The most common are notices of deficiency for failure to file a return, failure to pay, and incorrect information on a return.

The notice of deficiency for failure to file a return is sent to taxpayers who did not file a return or filed a return late. The notice informs the taxpayer of the IRS’s determination of the amount of tax owed and the deadline for paying the tax.

The notice of deficiency for failure to pay is sent to taxpayers who did not pay all of the tax they owe by the due date. The notice informs the taxpayer of the IRS’s determination of the amount of tax owed and the deadline for paying the tax.

The notice of deficiency for incorrect information on a return is sent to taxpayers who filed a return with incorrect information. The notice informs the taxpayer of the IRS’s determination of the amount of tax owed and the deadline for paying the tax.
Conclusion
It is important for taxpayers to understand what a notice of deficiency is because it is the first step in the process of resolving any tax issues. By understanding what the Notice of Deficiency is and what it means for the taxpayer, individuals can begin to take the necessary steps to resolve the issue.

Get the tax relief help you need by seeking tax resolution services. At Axiom Tax Resolution Group, our trusted tax professionals can help you address your problems with the IRS. Get in touch with us to know and discuss your options!